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ARTICLES

>> Article Written by Dr. Mary Davidian "Amniotic Membrane For Ocular Inflammation" Ophthalmology Management, June 1, 2013


NEWS


>>
Highland Ophthalmology Associates Offering New FDA-Approved Avedro Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking Procedure to Keratoconus Patients

>>
Highland Ophthalmology Establishes a Dry Eye Center of Excellence in the Hudson Valley of New York

>> Medical Eye Specialist Dr. Julia Mathews Joins New Windsor, New York Practice Highland Ophthalmology

>>
Highland Ophthalmology Introduces LipiFlow to Address Dry Eye Syndrome Caused by MGD

>>
Medical Eye Specialist Dr. Michael Stagner Joins New Windsor, New York Practice Highland Ophthalmology

>> Dr. Mary Davidian to Appear on American Health Front Program on NBC

>> Need for Eye Surgery Lessened by New Corneal Wound and Healing Treament

>> Highland Ophthalmology Opens New State-of-the-Art Vision Center

>> Highland Ophthalmology Celebrates Grand Opening of New Vision Center in New Windsor

>> Newburgh Ophthalmologists Offer Free Glaucoma Screenings Jan. 24

>> High-Tech Eye Care Right Here at Home

>> Eye Doctors Urge Exams During Glaucoma Awareness Month

>> Glaucoma Specialist Joins New Windsor, NY Ophthalmology Practice

>> New Windsor, NY Eye Surgeon Offers Alcon’s AcrySof® ReSTOR® Intraocular Lens for Cataract Correction

>> Alcon Launches AcrySof® ReSTOR® Apodized Diffractive IOL; Revolutionary Apodized Diffractive Technology Provides Highest Level of Freedom from Glasses

>> CMS Ruling Provides Medicare Patients Access to Alcon’s AcrySof® ReSTOR® IOL

 


HOA Procedures

Dry Eye or Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD)

There are two forms of Dry Eye disease.
Are you being treated for the right one?

Dry Eye occurs when the eyes do not produce sufficient tears or the tears evaporate too quickly. Without proper treatment, inadequate tears can make daily activities frustrating, affecting your personal and professional life, from reading to watching TV, to driving or working on the computer.

The most common form of Dry Eye is Evaporative Dry Eye, which affects 9 out of 10 (86%) Dry Eye cases. This form results from a shortage of oil in your tears caused by a blockage in your eyelid (Meibomian) glands, leading tears to evaporate faster than normal. This lack of tear oil is often referred to as Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD).

What Is Dry Eye?

Some people do not produce enough tears or the appropriate quality of tears to keep the eye healthy and comfortable. This is known as dry eye. Tears are produced by two different methods. One method produces tears at a slow, steady rate and is responsible for normal eye lubrication. The other method produces large quantities of tears in response to eye irritation or emotions. Tears that lubricate are constantly produced by a healthy eye. Excessive tearing occurs when the eye is irritated by a foreign body, dryness or when a person cries.

What Are The Symptoms Of Dry Eye?

The usual symptoms include:

    • stinging or burning eyes;
    • scratchiness;
    • stringy mucus in or around the eyes;
    • excessive eye irritation from smoke or wind;
    • excess tearing;
    • difficulty wearing contact lenses.

Excess tearing from "dry eye" sounds illogical, but if the tears responsible for maintenance lubrication do not keep the eye wet enough, the eye becomes irritated. When the eye is irritated, the lacrimal gland produces a large volume of tears that overwhelm the tear drainage system. These excess tears then overflow from your eye.

What Are The Symptoms of MGD

The usual symptoms include:

    • burning eyes;
    • dryness;
    • sensitivity to light;
    • blurred vision;
    • discomfort in windy or dry conditions.

What Is The Tear Film?

A film of tears, spread over the eye by a blink, makes the surface of the eye smooth and clear. Without our tear film, good vision would not be possible. The tear film consists of three layers:

    • an oily layer;
    • a watery layer;
    • a layer of mucus.

The oily layer, produced by the meibomian glands, forms the outermost surface of the tear film. Its main purpose is to smooth the tear surface and reduce evaporation of tears.

The middle aqueous (watery) layer makes up most of what we ordinarily think of as tears. This layer, produced by the lacrimal gland, cleanses the eye and washes away foreign particles or irritants.

The inner Mucin layer consists of mucus produced by the conjunctiva. Mucus allows the watery layer to spread evenly over the surface of the eye and helps the eye remain moist. Without mucus, tears would not stick to the eye.

What Causes Dry Eye?

Tear production normally decreases as we age. Although dry eye can occur in both men and women at any age, women are most often affected. This is especially true after menopause.

Dry eye also can be associated with other problems. For example, people with dry eyes, dry mouth and arthritis are said to have Sjogren's syndrome.

A wide variety of common medications — prescription and over-the-counter — can cause dry eye by reducing tear secretion. Be sure to tell your ophthalmologist the names of all the medications you are taking, especially if you are using:

    • diuretics;
    • beta-blockers;
    • antihistamines;
    • sleeping pills;
    • medications for "nerves";
    • pain relievers.

Since these medications are often necessary, the dry eye condition may have to be tolerated or treated with "artificial tears."

People with dry eye are often more prone to the toxic side effects of eye medications, including artificial tears. For example, the preservatives in certain eyedrops and artificial tear preparations can irritate the eye. Special preservative-free artificial tears may be required.

How Is Dry Eye Diagnosed?

A series of evaluations will be performed to determine if you have Dry Eye or MGD.

Dr. Mary Davidian is usually able to diagnose dry eye by examining the eyes. Sometimes tests that measure tear production may be necessary. One test, called the Schirmer tear test, involves placing filter-paper strips under the lower eyelids to measure the rate of tear production under various conditions. Another uses a diagnostic drop (fluorescein or rose bengal) to look for certain patterns of dryness on the surface of the eye.

We use the LipiView® Dry Eye Diagnostic and Visualization system to capture, archive, manipulate, and store digital images of specular (interferometric) observations of the tear film, which can be visually monitored and photographically documented. Click Here to learn more about Lipiview.

TearLab® Osmolarity System aids in accurate and early detection of Dry Eye Disease. The TearLab® Osmolarity System is intended to measure the osmolarity of human tears to aid in the diagnosis of dry eye disease in patients suspected of having dry eye disease, in conjunction with other methods of clinical evaluation.

Knowing what is causing your Dry Eye will help your doctor determine the best treatment option.

How Is Dry Eye Treated?

The right treatment for your dry eyes depends on a number of factors and the symptoms that you experience. There are many treatment options available to address the symptoms and work to increase or retain your own natural tears. The most common therapies are artificial tears, lubricant ointments, and punctal occlusion. In some cases, more advanced therapies, such as oral and topical medications and nutritional supplements are used.

Adding Tears

Eyedrops called artificial tears are similar to your own tears. They lubricate the eyes and help maintain moisture. Artificial tears are available without a prescription. There are many brands on the market, so you may want to try several to find the one you like best. Preservative-free eyedrops are available if you are sensitive to the preservatives in artificial tears. If you need to use artificial tears more than every two hours, preservative-free brands may be better for you. You can use the tears as often as necessary — once or twice a day or as often as several times an hour.

Conserving the Tears

Conserving your eyes' own tears is another approach to keeping the eyes moist. Tears drain out of the eye through a small channel into the nose (which is why your nose runs when you cry). Your ophthalmologist may close these channels either temporarily or permanently. The closure conserves your own tears and makes artificial tears last longer.

Other Methods

Tears evaporate like any other liquid. You can take steps to prevent evaporation. In winter, when indoor heat is on, a humidifier or a pan of water on the radiator adds moisture to dry air. Wrap-around glasses may reduce the drying effect of the wind, but are illegal to wear while driving in some states. Anything that may cause dryness, such as an overly warm room, hair dryers or wind, should be avoided by a person with dry eye. Smoking is especially bothersome. Some people with dry eye complain of "scratchy eyes" when they wake up. This symptom can be treated by using an artificial tear ointment or thick eyedrops at bedtime.

Use the smallest amount of ointment necessary for comfort, since the ointment can cause your vision to blur. Dry eye due to a lack of vitamin A in the diet is rare in the United States but is more common in poorer countries, especially among children. Ointments containing vitamin A can help dry eye if it is caused by unusual conditions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome or pemphigoid. Vitamin A supplements do not seem to help people with ordinary dry eye.

How Is MGD Treated?

LipiFlow® Thermal Pulsation

Highland Ophthalmology offers LipiFlow® Dry Eye Treatment to apply localized heat and pressure therapy for our adult patients with chronic cystic conditions of the eyelids, including Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD), also known as Evaporative Dry Eye or Lipid Deficiency Dry Eye.

LipiFlow works by applying directed energy to the eyelid near the affected glands — precisely targeted warmth from the back of the eyelid, and slight pressure from the front. This treatment is performed right in our office. The LipiFlow treatment can unblock glands, interrupt physical deterioration and, in most cases, provide symptom relief.

Click Here to learn more about LipiFlow® Thermal Pulsation.

 

Cliradex®

We also use Biotissue® Cliradex®, a natural, preservative-free lid, lash and facial cleanser that helps manage symptoms associated with blepharitis, Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD), rosacea, dry eye, demodex, chalazia and other lid margin diseases. Click Here to learn more about Claridex®.

 


Our office is within an easy commute from the following areas in the Hudson Valley and Orange County and Dutchess County: New Windsor, Cornwall, Fishkill, Middletown, Florida, Warwick, Monroe, Harriman, Fort Montgomery, Highland Falls, Marlboro, Walden, Wallkill, Pine Bush, Vails Gate, Goshen, Salisbury Mills, Washingtonville, Campbell Hall, Montgomery, West Point, Modena, New Paltz, Highland, Beacon, Castle Point, Wappingers Falls, Poughkeepsie, NY.

With this, Highland Ophthalmology has become New Windsor's leading specialty eye care center. Call (845) 562-0138 today for your first consultation.




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AcrySof® IQ Toric IOLs

 


AcrySof® IQ ReSTOR® IOLs

 



PROKERA®

 


 


 

 

TearLab® Osmolarity System

 



Copyright © 2016
Highland Ophthalmology Associates, LLC.
All rights reserved.

140 Executive Drive
New Windsor, NY 12553

Telephone (845) 562-0138
Fax (845) 562-0147

To see a map of our location and get directions, click here.

   
About HOA Procedures

Dr. Mary Davidian
Dr. Thien Huynh
Dr. Julia Mathew
Dr. Michael Stagner
Dr. Sharon Bean Powell
Dr. Miriam Rolf

Cataract Treatment
Cornea Transplants
Glaucoma Treatment
Dry Eye Treatment